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Divergent Wealth Advisors Review

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Divergent Wealth Advisors, LLC

Divergent Wealth Advisors is a fee-based firm located in South Jordan, Utah. In providing investment advisory services to its client base of individuals and institutions, the financial advisor specializes in family services and institutional services. 

As a fee-based firm, Divergent Wealth advisors may earn third-party compensation for recommending certain products and/or services, in addition to the advisory fees that clients pay. More on the firm's fee structure later in this review. 

Divergent Wealth Advisors Background

Founded in 2017, Divergent Wealth is indirectly owned by Jordan Collins and Brady Ririe. The registered investment advisor (RIA) provides services under a fiduciary obligation to work in each client’s best interests. 

The firm’s advisors offer many different industry credentials, including the certified financial planner (CFP), chartered retirement planning counselor (CRPC) and chartered retirement plans specialist (CRPS) designations. 

Divergent Wealth Advisors Client Types and Minimum Account Sizes 

Divergent Wealth serves individuals, high-net-worth individuals, families, partnerships, trusts, estates, charitable organizations, pension and corporate retirement plans, corporations, limited liability companies and other business types. The firm doesn’t impose any minimum account size requirements. 

Services Offered by Divergent Wealth Advisors

Divergent Wealth offers the following advisory services:

  • Portfolio management
  • Financial planning and consulting
  • Retirement planning and consulting 

The firm also offers a complimentary planning session for clients looking for financial planning guidance. 

Divergent Wealth Advisors Investment Philosophy 

Divergent Wealth’s website says its investment approach is based on the following six principles: diversification matters, cost is key, buy low and sell high, master your emotions, market timing is impossible and markets eventually recover.

In analyzing and reviewing securities, the firm employs technical analysis, exchange-traded fund (ETF) and/or mutual fund analysis and fundamental analysis.

Divergent Wealth’s investment strategies rely on asset allocation, debt securities, ETFs, long-term purchases, fixed income investing, individual stocks, mutual funds, variable annuities, real estate investment trusts (REITs) and short-term purchases. 

Fees Under Divergent Wealth Advisors

Divergent Wealth has different fee arrangements for its financial planning and consulting, retirement plan consulting and portfolio management services. For financial planning and consulting, clients pay flat fees ranging from $1,500 to $10,000. Hourly fees for these services won’t exceed $250, according to the firm’s brochure. 

The firm says its retirement plan consulting services come with fixed fees that also don’t exceed $250. Divergent Wealth’s asset-based fees for these services don’t exceed 1.60% of assets under management (AUM).

For portfolio management, annual advisory fees also won’t exceed 1.60% of AUM. Here's the maximum fee you would pay based on the size of your account:

*Estimated investment management fees do not include brokerage, custodial, third-party manager or other fees, which can vary in amount.
Estimated Investment Management Fees at Divergent Wealth Advisors*
Your Assets Divergent Wealth Advisors Fee Amounts
$500K $8,000
$1MM $16,000
$5MM $80,000
$10MM $160,000

What to Watch Out For

Divergent Wealth doesn’t have any legal or regulatory disclosures on the Form ADV filed most recently with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission. 

Though Divergent Wealth is a fiduciary, some of the firm’s advisors can earn commissions for selling securities and insurance product sales. This can incentivize advisors to recommend such products based on compensation earned, not client suitability. However, the firm must abide by fiduciary duty to always act in the client's best interest.  

All information was accurate as of the writing of this article. 

Investing Tips for Beginners

  • Asset allocation and portfolio diversification are useful strategies when investing. But before you begin, you should make sure you have a solid understanding of the different types of investments. Traditional investments generally include stocks, mutual funds, bonds or ETFs. Alternative investments, on the other hand, include commodities, derivatives, currencies, structured settlements, venture capital, private equity and other investment types.
  • If you'd like to work with a financial advisor, SmartAsset's free financial advisor matching service pairs you with up to three advisors in your area. The tool asks you to complete a short questionnaire about your financial situation, and then it connects you with the professionals most suitable to your needs. 

How Long $1mm Lasts in Retirement

SmartAsset's interactive map highlights places where $1 million will last the longest in retirement. Zoom between states and the national map to see the top spots in each region. Also, scroll over any city to learn about the cost of living in retirement for that location.

Least
Most
Rank City Housing Expenses Food Expenses Healthcare Expenses Utilities Expenses Transportation Expenses

Methodology We analyzed data on average expenditures for seniors, cost of living and investment returns to determine how many years of retirement a $1 million nest egg would cover in cities across America.

First, we looked at data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) on the average annual expenditures of seniors. We then applied cost of living data from the Council for Community and Economic Research to adjust those national average spending levels based on the costs of each expense category (housing, food, healthcare, utilities, transportation and other) in each city. Using this data, SmartAsset calculated the average cost of living for retirees in the largest U.S. cities.

We assumed the $1 million would grow at a real return (interest minus inflation) of 2%. Then, we divided $1 million by the sum of each of those annual numbers to determine how long $1 million would cover retirement expenses in each of the cities in our study. Cities where $1 million lasted the longest ranked the highest in the study.

Sources: Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), Council for Community and Economic Research