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Triad Advisors Review

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Triad Advisors

Triad Advisors

Triad Advisors is a financial services firm specializing in asset management, retirement planning and more. ThinkAdvisor magazine ranked it as No. 1 for Hybrid RIAs. The firm currently has more than $920 million in assets under management. 

Triad Advisors Background

This Georgia-based firm was founded in 1998. Today, Ladenburg Thalmann Financial Services Inc. owns it. The large practice delivers independent advisory and brokerage services to registered investment advisors (RIA) and focuses on providing these services with an edge on technology.  

Its president and CEO Jeffrey L. Rosenthal has more than 20 years of experience. 

What Types of Clients Does Triad Advisors Accept?

Triad works with various clients including: 

  • Individuals
  • High-net-worth individuals
  • Trusts
  • Estates
  • Pension and profit-sharing plans
  • Charitable institutions 
  • Foundations
  • Endowments
  • Corporations

Triad Advisors Minimum Account Size

Triad doesn’t impose a minimum account size requirement for its investment advisory services. However, the firm may recommend the use of third-party managers who may have minimum requirements. These details can be found on the manager’s public disclosure brochure available on the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) website. 

Services Offered by Triad Advisors

Triad focuses on investment management, financial planning and retirement plan services. It also engages in third-party asset management consulting. 

Depending on your specific needs as a client, the firm’s advisors are equipped to provide advice on the following topics: 

  • Personal financial planning
  • Insurance and estate planning
  • Capital need analysis
  • Tax planning 
  • Cash flow planning
  • Retirement planning
  • Investment analysis and planning
  • Education planning
  • Performance reports

The firm can also construct, manage and monitor diversified investment portfolios for its clients based on individual factors such as investment goals and risk tolerance. In addition, the firm can provide fiduciary services to employer-sponsored retirement plans under the Employee Retirement Income Security Act (ERISA). These services may include advice around fund selection and education for plan participants. 

Triad Advisors Investment Philosophy

Third-party managers working through Triad will have their own investment strategies and philosophies, which you can view on their SEC disclosure brochures. For instance, some may prioritize fundamental analysis. This method involves gauging the financial health of companies by examining their financial records, state of their competitors, management team and other factors in order to make projections about the companies’ future and decide whether to invest in them. 

These advisors generally don’t limit asset allocations to specific securities. Instead, they focus on what types may be right based on personal factors such as your time horizon and risk tolerance. Your portfolio may invest in the following securities:

  • Stocks
  • Bonds
  • Mutual funds
  • Exchange-traded funds (ETFs)
  • Options
  • Alternative investments 

Fees Under Triad Advisors

For financial planning and consulting, the firm charges fees on a fixed or hourly rate. These fees are negotiable, but determined based on the complexity of the services rendered. 

Fees for portfolio management services are determined by your specific third-party fund manager. However, advisors generally charge investment fees as a percentage of the size of your account. You can find full details in the advisory agreement you signed with the third-party service provider. 

What to Watch Out For

Triad and the advisors it works with may receive compensation from third-party firms for recommending their products or services. This can create a conflict of interest as some advisors may recommend specific products for potential higher compensation. However, Triad has a fiduciary duty to work in your best interests. Its code of conduct was written to limit the potential for such conflicts. The firm must also disclose potential conflicts of interest. 

Disclosures

In 2007, the financial industry regulatory authority (FINRA) filed a complaint against Triad that involved consolidated reports and branch audits, among other topics. Triad consented to a censure and paid a fine of $650,000, restitution to customers totaling $375,000, and a review of and revision to its consolidated reporting and branch audit processes. 

Opening an Account With Triad Advisors

To contact Triad, call (800) 720-4003 or send a message on its site, http://www.triad-advisors.com/join-triad/request-information. 

Where Is Triad Advisors Located?

You can find Triad at the following address: 5155 Peachtree Parkway, Norcross,  Georgia 30092. 

Tips on Finding the Right Financial Advisor 

  • Ask how advisor candidates get paid. Those whose only compensation is the fees they collect from you will likely have fewer conflicts of interests than those who also receive commissions. That said, if any advisors say they are fiduciaries, that means they must work in your best interests.
  • Personalize your search. Use SmartAsset’s financial advisor matching tool. It connects you with up to three financial advisors in your area. 

All information was accurate as of the writing of this article.

How Many Years $1 Million Lasts in Retirement

SmartAsset's interactive map highlights places where $1 million will last the longest in retirement. Zoom between states and the national map to see the top spots in each region. Also, scroll over any city to learn about the cost of living in retirement for that location.

Least
Most
Rank City Housing Expenses Food Expenses Healthcare Expenses Utilities Expenses Transportation Expenses

Methodology To determine how long a $1 million nest egg would cover retirement costs in cities across America, we analyzed data on average expenditures for seniors, cost of living and investment returns.

First, we looked at data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) on the average annual expenditures of seniors. We then applied cost of living data from the Council for Community and Economic Research to adjust those national average spending levels based on the costs of each expense category (housing, food, healthcare, utilities, transportation and other) in each city. Using this data, SmartAsset calculated the average cost of living for retirees in the largest U.S. cities.

We assumed the $1 million would grow at a real return (interest minus inflation) of 2%. This reflects the typical return on a conservative investment portfolio. Then, we divided $1 million by the sum of each of those annual numbers to determine how long $1 million would cover retirement expenses in each of the cities in our study. Cities where $1 million lasted the longest ranked the highest in the study.

Sources: Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), Council for Community and Economic Research