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Viking Global Investors Review

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Viking Global Investors LP

Viking Global Investors is a hedge fund with its headquarters located in Greenwich, Connecticut, a short distance northeast of New York City. The firm may be on the smaller side compared to some other hedge funds, but it still has over $42 billion in assets under management (AUM) spread across 12 pooled investment vehicles, also known as funds. The firm employs a team of 49 financial advisors to help manage its funds, while other employees are responsible for the rest of the firm's day-to-day operations. The firm invests in both public and private markets around the world.

If you're looking to start investing like a hedge fund, it may be a good idea to first work with a financial advisor. Use SmartAsset's free tool to get matched with advisors in your area today.

Viking Global Investors Background

Viking Global Investors was founded in 1999 and is currently principally owned by O. Andreas Halvorsen and David C. Ott, both directly and indirectly through Viking Global Investors LP and Viking Global Partners, LLC. The firm has fund families that have been started since the company went into business. These funds were established in 1999, 2009 and 2015.

Viking works with an incredibly diverse client base. Clients that invest in the firm's funds include charities, endowments, pensions, sovereign entities, funds of funds, other investment companies, trusts and individuals.

Viking Global Investors Investment Philosophy

Viking Global Investors has three main strategies, each defined by its own family of funds. The Viking Global Equities Funds are long/short hedge funds that launched in 1999. The Viking Long Funds are a family of long funds that launched in 2009. Finally, the Viking Global Opportunities Funds are a set of liquid/illiquid funds that launched recently in 2015. These families of funds all use a variety of public and private investments to drive growth, though more specific strategies vary by fund.

The Viking Global Equities Funds are the oldest funds at the firm. The firm uses gross exposure to measure the leverage of these funds, and aims to keep gross exposure under 250%. Net exposure, on the other hand, tends to be less than 60% in this family of funds.The Viking Long Funds mirror the same strategies, but focus on long-term results instead of having a broader base. The Viking Global Opportunities Funds tend to be more aggressive, searching to maximize returns by making liquid and illiquid investments across the globe.

As the name might suggest, Viking Global Investors and other hedge funds look to drive growth by implementing a hedged approach. At Viking, this involves taking both long and short positions and working to maintain low net exposure to limit downside while capturing gains. Over the long term, the firm looks to outperform the market as a whole.

Largest Hedge Funds Managed by Viking Global Investors

Viking Global Equities Master, Ltd.

  • AUM: $27,000,932,672
  • Minimum: $5,000,000
  • Beneficial Owners: 560

Viking Global Opportunities Master, LP

  • AUM: $7,850,162,196
  • Minimum: $5,000,000
  • Beneficial Owners: 152

Viking Long Fund Master, Ltd.

  • AUM: $6,713,424,137
  • Minimum: $5,000,000
  • Beneficial Owners: 152

Viking Global Equities II, LP

  • AUM: $558,591,985
  • Minimum: $5,000
  • Beneficial Owners: 91

Fees at Viking Global Investors

Fees at Viking Global Investors are charged based on a percentage of the total value of a fund. These fees are charged on a monthly basis.

The Viking Global Equities Funds incur a fee of 0.125% of the fund's market value each month. The Viking Long Funds are charged at the same rate, as are the Opportunities Funds.

A performance fee, known as an incentive allocation, is also charged to each fund. The rate for these performance fees is 20% of net gains. For more information about the specifics of the firm's fee schedules, get in touch with the firm directly.

What to Watch Out For

Accredited investors are the only ones who can invest in hedge funds. To be considered an accredited investor, you need to have at least $200,000 of earned income ($300,000 for couples) over the past two years in conjunction with a reasonable assumption that the same will happen during the current year. You can also be considered an accredited investor if you have at least a $1 million net worth (minus the value of your primary residence) on your own or together with a spouse.

Viking Global Investors has no disclosures on its SEC-filed Form ADV.

Becoming a Client of Viking Global Investors

Remember, you can only be a client of Viking Global Investors if you're an accredited investor or an institution. If you meet these requirements, you can get in touch with the firm about investing or opening an account. To do so, you should either email the firm or call over the phone.

Investing Tips

  • Investing isn't just about buying and selling securities. It also involves building a plan for the future and working towards it. Finding a financial advisor who can help you with this doesn’t have to be hard, though. SmartAsset’s free tool matches you with financial advisors in your area in 5 minutes. Get started now.
  • When it comes to investing on your own, you should do everything you can to get started on the right foot. SmartAsset has you covered with lots of free online resources to aid your process. For example, check out our free asset allocation calculator today.

How Long $1mm Lasts in Retirement

SmartAsset's interactive map highlights places where $1 million will last the longest in retirement. Zoom between states and the national map to see the top spots in each region. Also, scroll over any city to learn about the cost of living in retirement for that location.

Least
Most
Rank City Housing Expenses Food Expenses Healthcare Expenses Utilities Expenses Transportation Expenses

Methodology We analyzed data on average expenditures for seniors, cost of living and investment returns to determine how many years of retirement a $1 million nest egg would cover in cities across America.

First, we looked at data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) on the average annual expenditures of seniors. We then applied cost of living data from the Council for Community and Economic Research to adjust those national average spending levels based on the costs of each expense category (housing, food, healthcare, utilities, transportation and other) in each city. Using this data, SmartAsset calculated the average cost of living for retirees in the largest U.S. cities.

We assumed the $1 million would grow at a real return (interest minus inflation) of 2%. Then, we divided $1 million by the sum of each of those annual numbers to determine how long $1 million would cover retirement expenses in each of the cities in our study. Cities where $1 million lasted the longest ranked the highest in the study.

Sources: Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), Council for Community and Economic Research