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Kansas Property Tax Calculator

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Overview of Kansas Taxes

While the typical homeowner in Kansas pays just $1,793 annually in real estate taxes, lower than the national average, property tax rates in Kansas are fairly high. The state’s average effective property tax rate is 1.40%. This ranks as the 15th highest of all states.

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  • About This Answer

    To calculate the exact amount of property tax you will owe requires your property's assessed value and the property tax rates based on your property's address. Please note that we can only estimate your property tax based on median property taxes in your area. There are typically multiple rates in a given area, because your state, county, local schools and emergency responders each receive funding partly through these taxes. In our calculator, we take your home value and multiply that by your county's effective property tax rate. This is equal to the median property tax paid as a percentage of the median home value in your county.

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  • Our Tax Expert

    Jennifer Mansfield Tax

    Jennifer Mansfield, CPA, JD/LLM-Tax, is a Certified Public Accountant with more than 30 years of experience providing tax advice. SmartAsset’s tax expert has a degree in Accounting and Business/Management from the University of Wyoming, as well as both a Masters in Tax Laws and a Juris Doctorate from Georgetown University Law Center. Jennifer has mostly worked in public accounting firms, including Ernst & Young and Deloitte. She is passionate about helping provide people and businesses with valuable accounting and tax advice to allow them to prosper financially. Jennifer lives in Arizona and was recently named to the Greater Tucson Leadership Program.

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Kansas Property Taxes

Photo credit: ©iStock.com/PikeOnline

The revenue raised by property taxes in Kansas goes to city and county governments to pay for services such as fire protection, roads, parks and public schools. While the typical homeowner in Kansas pays just $1,793 annually in real estate taxes, lower than the national average, property tax rates in Kansas are fairly high. The state’s average effective property tax rate (annual property taxes paid as a percentage of home value) is 1.40%. This is the 15th highest of all states.

However, rates differ depending on where you live. Below, we’ll look at property tax rates across the state of Kansas and review some key rules to know for all homeowners in the Sunflower State.

How Kansas Property Taxes Work

If you recently bought a home in Kansas, you may be confused the first time you receive a property tax bill. That’s OK – we’re here to help. There are several different numbers to know when trying to figure out your property taxes. The first is appraised value. This is equal to the market value of your home, and is recalculated every year by your county appraiser based on factors such as the sales prices of nearby homes and changes made to your property.

County appraisers are only required to visit every property in their county once every six years. The rest of the time they appraise based on general market data. Appraisals aren’t always perfect. It’s a good idea to keep an eye out for your annual notice of value, which is sent out by March 1st. If you believe your home has been over-appraised, you can talk to your county appraiser or you have 30 days to file an official appeal.

Your appraised value is the basis for your property taxes but local rates apply to a different number: assessed value. Kansas has a statewide assessment percentage of 11.5%. This means that assessed value is equal to 11.5% of appraised value. This number is only used for determining property taxes and otherwise does not have any application.

If you are looking into buying a home in Kansas or are interested in refinancing a property there, check out our Kansas mortgage guide for important information about mortgage rates and the types of loans you’ll be considering when getting a home loan in the Sunflower State

Kansas Property Tax Rates

Kansas tax rates are described in terms of mill levies. A mill levy is equal to $1 of taxes for every $1,000 in assessed value. So, if your assessed value is $50,000 and you have a mill levy of 30, your real estate taxes will total $1,500.

There is a 20 mill statewide tax rate that is used to support education but the first $2,300 in assessed value is exempt. That means nearly all homeowners receive a tax deduction of $46 right off the bat.

Because of the appraisal and assessment system in Kansas, it is difficult to compare rates between areas or with the rates in other states. For that purpose, it is useful to look at effective property tax rates, which are median annual tax payments as a percentage of median home value. The table below shows median annual tax payments, median home value and effective property tax rates for every county in Kansas.

CountyMedian Home ValueMedian Annual Property Tax PaymentAverage Effective Property Tax Rate
Allen$63,300$9581.51%
Anderson$96,300$1,3851.44%
Atchison$87,000$1,3881.60%
Barber$61,900$8311.34%
Barton$75,300$1,2001.59%
Bourbon$78,400$1,1421.46%
Brown$77,100$1,0251.33%
Butler$127,800$2,0871.63%
Chase$81,100$1,2661.56%
Chautauqua$46,500$9021.94%
Cherokee$71,600$9161.28%
Cheyenne$76,700$1,0401.36%
Clark$59,800$1,0331.73%
Clay$85,700$1,3811.61%
Cloud$66,100$1,0361.57%
Coffey$98,200$1,2391.26%
Comanche$54,100$8241.52%
Cowley$80,600$1,3091.62%
Crawford$83,800$1,0291.23%
Decatur$53,500$1,0541.97%
Dickinson$106,700$1,3981.31%
Doniphan$83,300$1,0881.31%
Douglas$180,300$2,4071.33%
Edwards$56,500$7621.35%
Elk$52,100$1,0702.05%
Ellis$138,400$1,7241.25%
Ellsworth$73,300$1,1011.50%
Finney$109,700$1,4831.35%
Ford$88,800$1,5261.72%
Franklin$119,700$1,7751.48%
Geary$136,500$1,9821.45%
Gove$71,500$1,0081.41%
Graham$63,800$9621.51%
Grant$90,900$1,0521.16%
Gray$105,900$1,6371.55%
Greeley$78,500$1,2851.64%
Greenwood$56,800$9251.63%
Hamilton$75,100$1,1371.51%
Harper$66,100$1,1851.79%
Harvey$111,600$1,6431.47%
Haskell$103,300$1,2341.19%
Hodgeman$76,500$1,2011.57%
Jackson$118,200$1,6101.36%
Jefferson$125,800$1,9201.53%
Jewell$56,500$7221.28%
Johnson$210,900$2,7901.32%
Kearny$91,700$1,0701.17%
Kingman$86,700$1,2791.48%
Kiowa$102,800$1,4441.40%
Labette$66,100$1,1691.77%
Lane$58,200$8381.44%
Leavenworth$165,800$2,2721.37%
Lincoln$63,500$1,2692.00%
Linn$98,000$1,2771.30%
Logan$72,700$1,0141.39%
Lyon$93,100$1,5371.65%
Marion$83,000$1,4191.71%
Marshall$81,700$1,1061.35%
McPherson$124,600$1,7151.38%
Meade$85,500$1,1561.35%
Miami$162,500$2,3011.42%
Mitchell$74,600$1,2031.61%
Montgomery$71,200$1,1061.55%
Morris$81,900$1,2151.48%
Morton$82,100$1,1141.36%
Nemaha$95,200$1,2141.28%
Neosho$68,900$1,1901.73%
Ness$57,200$7671.34%
Norton$66,000$9181.39%
Osage$99,000$1,5001.52%
Osborne$51,200$8351.63%
Ottawa$93,400$1,4421.54%
Pawnee$73,700$1,2681.72%
Phillips$64,400$9931.54%
Pottawatomie$153,700$1,5971.04%
Pratt$79,000$1,5021.90%
Rawlins$66,700$9651.45%
Reno$90,600$1,4711.62%
Republic$49,200$9071.84%
Rice$74,200$1,1321.53%
Riley$170,400$2,2411.32%
Rooks$62,500$9461.51%
Rush$57,300$9001.57%
Russell$65,000$1,1151.72%
Saline$119,500$1,6341.37%
Scott$104,800$1,5381.47%
Sedgwick$124,000$1,6271.31%
Seward$90,000$1,3331.48%
Shawnee$120,300$1,8591.55%
Sheridan$77,900$1,1751.51%
Sherman$74,200$1,0881.47%
Smith$60,800$1,2152.00%
Stafford$60,900$8241.35%
Stanton$81,000$1,1371.40%
Stevens$86,200$1,0071.17%
Sumner$85,500$1,4181.66%
Thomas$97,200$1,4481.49%
Trego$74,500$1,2011.61%
Wabaunsee$112,200$1,5141.35%
Wallace$61,900$1,1831.91%
Washington$58,300$9231.58%
Wichita$71,100$1,3251.86%
Wilson$63,200$8761.39%
Woodson$50,900$9241.82%
Wyandotte$93,800$1,6781.79%

Johnson County

With a population of nearly 550,000, Johnson County is the largest in the state of Kansas. The median real estate tax payment in Johnson County is $2,790, highest in the state. However, that is largely driven by higher real estate values in Johnson County, where the median home value is $210,900.

Property tax rates in Johnson County, which lies south of Kansas City and contains the city of Overland Park, are actually lower than average in Kansas. The average effective property tax rate in the county is 1.32%, which ranks as the 17th lowest of Kansas’s 105 counties.

Sedgwick County

Sedgwick County is located in central Kansas. The county seat is Wichita, which is the largest city in Kansas. Relative to the rest of the state, Sedgwick County property tax rates are fairly low. The county’s average effective property tax rate of 1.31% is 15th lowest in the state. That is based off of an average mill levy (which applies to assessed value) of around 122 mills.

Shawnee County

The average effective property tax rate in Shawnee County is 1.55% but property tax rates in the county vary a fair amount between rural and urban areas. In 2010 and 2011, average mill rates for urban homeowners were 22 mills higher than those for rural homeowners. That means that someone with an assessed value of $10,000 could expect to pay about $220 less annually in a rural area than an urban area.

Wyandotte County

In 2014, Wyandotte County collected nearly $194,000,000 in property taxes from county property owners. Roughly 45% of that tax was paid by residential homeowners (commercial property owners paid 40%). The average effective property tax rate for homeowners in Wyandotte County is 1.79%, the 12th highest rate in the state.

Photo credit: ©iStock.com/Lokibaho

Douglas County

The largest recipients of property tax revenue in Douglas County are schools, which receive about 43% of all revenue. The county government receives 32% of tax revenue. The county’s median annual property payment of $2,407 is the second highest in the state, although rates are not especially high. Douglas County’s average effective property tax rate is 1.34%, which ranks as the 19th lowest in the state.

Leavenworth County

Leavenworth County is a part of the Kansas City metropolitan area, in northeast Kansas. The property tax rate in the county is 1.37%, similar to other nearby counties. At that rate, a homeowner with a home worth $150,000 would pay annual property taxes of about $2,055.

Riley County

Riley County is home to the city of Manhattan and Kansas State University. Property tax rates in the county are slightly below the state average. The county’s average effective property tax rate is 1.32%. However, people living in urban areas generally pay higher rates than people in rural areas. In 2011, urban residents of Riley County faced an average mill levy that was 27 mills higher than those in rural areas.

Butler County

The average effective property tax rate in Butler County is 1.63%, the 23rd highest rate in the state. However, the median property tax payment ranks as the 6th highest in the state at $2,087 per year. While that is relatively high for Kansas, it is below the national average of $2,107.

Reno County

The median home value in Reno County is $90,600, about half the national average. That means that while annual property tax payments are relatively low, with a median of $1,471, rates are not. The average effective property tax rate in Reno County is 1.62%, well above the national average.

Saline County

Located in central Kansas, Saline County has property tax rates near the state average. The average effective property tax rate in the county is 1.37%. As in many other Kansas counties, urban homeowners pay higher rates than those in rural areas. In 2009, 2010 and 2011 the average urban rate in Saline County was always as least 35 mills higher than the rural rate.

Property Tax: Which Counties are Getting the Best Bang for Their Buck

SmartAsset’s interactive map highlights the places across the country where property tax dollars are being spent most effectively. Zoom between states and the national map to see the counties getting the biggest bang for their property tax buck.

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Rank County Property Tax Rate School Rating Crimes Per 100k People

Methodology

Our study aims to find the places in the United States where people are getting the most for their property tax dollars. To do this we looked at school rankings, crime rates and property taxes for every county.

As a way to measure the quality of schools, we calculated the average math and reading/language arts proficiencies for all the school districts in the country. Within each state, these schools were then ranked between 1 and 10 (with 10 being the best) based on those average scores.

For each county, we calculated the violent and property crimes per 100,000 residents.

Using the school and crime numbers, we calculated a community score. This is the ratio of the school rank to the combined crime rate per 100,000 residents.

We used the number of households, median home value and average property tax rate to calculate a per capita property tax collected for each county.

Finally, we calculated a tax value by creating a ratio of the community score to the per capita property tax paid. This shows us the counties in the country where people are getting the most bang for their buck, or where their property tax dollars are going the furthest.

Sources: US Census Bureau 2016 American Community Survey, Department of Education, Federal Bureau of Investigation, State Police or Justice Department websites