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3 Easy Ways to Boost Your Retirement Income

Saving for the future can be intimidating. But you don’t want to put it off or settle for strategies that save you very little. There are plenty of ways to take charge of your finances now in order to enjoy a big payoff later in retirement. So whether you’ve recently started your career or you’re counting the months to freedom, here are three simple ways to grow your nest egg.

Find out now: How much do I need to save for retirement?

1. Automate & Monitor Your Accounts

Knowing how much you need to save for retirement can make it easier to start saving and investing. Once you assess your situation, you can rein in your spending at every stage and stash more in your savings accounts.

Automatically saving a portion of your income each month can help you boost your savings without having to think about it. It’s also a good idea to pay attention to your accounts to make sure you’re aware of any changes.

2. Find Passive Income Streams

3 Easy Ways to Boost Your Retirement Income

Having a passive stream of income is another way to boost your retirement income. Rental properties, for example, can supplement the income you’re putting into an IRA or a 401(k). Being a landlord isn’t for everyone, but you can start small or just rent out a spare room in your home.

Investments are great wealth building tools as well. You don’t have to be the Wolf of Wall Street to build a balanced portfolio with serious potential. If you want to try something different, you can look into setting up an annuity, the tax-deferred investment that provides a regular stream of income after you retire. These have pros and cons, of course.

No matter what avenue you choose, it’s a good idea to understand what you’re getting yourself into from the start. If you need guidance, you can always turn to an expert for advice.

3. Increase Your Social Security Benefits

On average, Social Security recipients can expect to receive $1,341 a month in 2016. While that’s not a lot of money to work with, there are ways to boost the amount of money in your Social Security check. For instance, working longer and putting off retirement will automatically increase your benefit level (up to age 70). For every year that you don’t take your benefit between full retirement age (62) and 70, it increases by about 8%.

Bottom Line

3 Easy Ways to Boost Your Retirement Income

Living on a fixed income can be challenging, especially when you’re trying to build your nest egg. But making small changes throughout the course of your career can set you up for a more comfortable retirement. By creating a comprehensive savings strategy and having multiple sources of income, you can stop worrying about retirement and move forward confidently.

And of course, you don’t have to do this alone. Working with a financial advisor can be a great way to stay on track on saving for retirement. A matching tool like SmartAsset’s SmartAdvisor can help you find a person to work with to meet your needs. First you’ll answer a series of questions about your situation and goals. Then the program will narrow down your options from thousands of advisors to up to three registered investment advisors who suit your needs. You can then read their profiles to learn more about them, interview them on the phone or in person and choose who to work with in the future. This allows you to find a good fit while the program does much of the hard work for you.

Photo credit: ©iStock.com/Halfpoint, ©iStock.com/michaeljung, ©iStock.com/laflor

Liz Smith Liz Smith is a graduate of New York University and has been passionate about helping people make better financial decisions since her college days. Liz has been writing for SmartAsset for more than four years. Her areas of expertise include retirement, credit cards and savings. She also focuses on all money issues for millennials. Liz's articles have been featured across the web, including on AOL Finance, Business Insider and WNBC. The biggest personal finance mistake she sees people making: not contributing to retirement early in their careers.
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