Loading
Tap on the profile icon to edit
your financial details.

Horizon Wealth Management

Your Details Done
by Updated
Horizon Wealth Management

Horizon Wealth Management is a registered investment advisor (RIA) firm that provides an array of services, including holistic financial planning and portfolio management. Headquartered in LaGrange, Illinois, it provides asset management services on a wrap-fee basis only. The financial advisor firm currently holds more than $3 million in assets under management (AUM). 

Horizon Wealth Management Background 

Horizon Wealth Management was founded in 2005 by current principal Ryan Williamson, along with Richard Shanley and Paul Fousek. Today, it employs certified financial planners (CFP), accredited investment fiduciaries (AIF) and a registered sales assistant. 

It was recognized as an Industry Business Leader in 2010 by the West Suburban Chamber of Commerce. Chicago Magazine also ranked it as a Top Scoring Wealth Manager in 2010, 2011 and 2012. 

What Types of Clients Does Horizon Wealth Management Accept?

Horizon Wealth Management mostly works with individuals. Only 37 of these have a high-net-worth, according to recent filings with the SEC. However, the firm also extends its services to businesses, charitable organizations, trusts, estates and retirement plans.

Horizon Wealth Management Minimum Account Size

To receive asset management services from Horizon Wealth Management, you’d generally need a minimum aggregate account balance of $250,000. 

Services Offered by Horizon Wealth Management

Horizon Wealth Management offers various financial management services including financial planning, asset management and individual tailoring of advice to clients. 

The firm works with individuals and families to create a general financial plan, which may touch upon the following topics: 

  • Retirement planning
  • Investment planning
  • Estate planning
  • Tax planning
  • Education investing
  • Debt analysis

Prior to providing these services, the firm conducts an analysis of clients to assess their personal financial goals and objectives. 

In addition, the firm offers asset management services based on a wrap-fee program. In this case, the firm can create a portfolio with securities such as mutual funds and exchange-traded funds (ETFs). Following construction of the portfolio, Horizon Wealth Management reviews the investments at least quarterly and rebalances them if deemed necessary based on the client’s goals. You have the opportunity to place reasonable restrictions on the types of securities the portfolio invests in.

Horizon Wealth Management Investment Philosophy

Horizon Wealth Management deploys a variety of strategies when making investment decisions. For instance, it reviews charts of market and security activity to determine ups and downs, as well as projected time spans of these swings. Key points in its fundamental analysis include the evaluation of companies to determine whether they are overpriced or underpriced. It also conducts sentimental analysis to measure how optimistic or pessimistic people overall may be under current market conditions. 

It also employs its own models to drive its asset allocation decisions utilizing mutual funds and ETFs.

Fees Under Horizon Wealth Management

For asset-management services, Horizon Wealth Management charges a wrap fee equivalent to a negotiated percentage of assets under management. However, this fee won’t exceed 1.50%. Generally, these fees are deducted from the account. These are charged quarterly. The firm will make adjustments for account deposits and withdrawals to make sure fees are charged on the amount within the account. 

The Wrap Asset Management fee doesn’t include other fees you may incur such as expenses charged by managers of mutual funds, ETFs or other index funds. 

The firm charges a flat fee for financial planning and consulting services based on the scope of the services rendered. These fees can extend from $150 to $2,000 per hour.

What to Watch Out For

Advisors with Horizon Wealth Management are representatives of LPL Financial. They may receive commissions from recommending certain securities. This arrangement may create a conflict of interest if advisors are incentivised to recommend specific securities based on potential compensation.

Horizon Wealth Management states, "To minimize this conflict, our representatives will adhere to our firm’s Code of Ethics and act in the best interest of the client."

In addition, representatives of the firm include licensed insurance salesmen. Thus, they may be incentivised to recommend insurance products from which they receive commissions. 

Disclosures

Horizon Wealth Management has not reported any disclosures related to receiving disciplinary action, according to its latest Form ADV. This is a document firms must file with the SEC to maintain status with the Securities and Exchange Commision (SEC) and state securities authorities. 

Opening an Account with Horizon Wealth Management

The simplest way to open an account with Horizon Wealth Management is to visit their office in LaGrange, Illinois, to discuss the firm's services. You can also visit the firm's website to send a message. Furthermore, you can reach the firm by dialing (708) 352-4300. 

Where Is Horizon Wealth Management Located?

Horizon Wealth Management is located at 22 Calendar Court, Second Floor, LaGrange, Illinois 60525. 

Tips for Working With an Advisor 

How Many Years $1 Million Lasts in Retirement

SmartAsset's interactive map highlights places where $1 million will last the longest in retirement. Zoom between states and the national map to see the top spots in each region. Also, scroll over any city to learn about cost of living in retirement there.

Least
Most
Rank City Housing Expenses Food Expenses Healthcare Expenses Utilities Expenses Transportation Expenses

Methodology SmartAsset calculated the average cost of living for retirees in the largest U.S. cities. Using that calculation, we determined how many years $1 million would last in retirement in each major city.

First, we looked at data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) on the average annual expenditures of seniors throughout the country. We then applied cost of living data from the Council for Community and Economic Research to adjust those national average spending levels based on the costs of each expense category (housing, food, healthcare, utilities, transportation and other) in each city.

We assumed the $1 million would grow at a real return (interest minus inflation) of 2%, reflecting the typical return on a conservative investment portfolio. Finally, we divided $1 million by the sum of each of those annual numbers to determine how long $1 million would last in each of the cities in our study.

Sources: Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), Council for Community and Economic Research