Loading
Tap on the profile icon to edit
your financial details.

Ramsey County, MN Property Tax Calculator

Your Details Done

Overview of Ramsey County, MN Taxes

Do you own property in Ramsey County, Minnesota? If so, you should be familiar with the county’s property tax system. The average effective property tax rate in Ramsey County is 1.33%.

Not in Minnesota?
Enter your financial details to calculate your taxes
Enter Your Location
Dismiss
Assessed Home Value
Dismiss
Average Tax Rate
0.0%
Property Taxes
$0
(Annual)
How Your Property Taxes Compare Based on an Assessed Home Value of
of Assessed Home Value
of Assessed Home Value
National
of Assessed Home Value
  • About This Answer

    To calculate the exact amount of property tax you will owe requires your property's assessed value and the property tax rates based on your property's address. Please note that we can only estimate your property tax based on median property taxes in your area. There are typically multiple rates in a given area, because your state, county, local schools and emergency responders each receive funding partly through these taxes. In our calculator, we take your home value and multiply that by your county's effective property tax rate. This is equal to the median property tax paid as a percentage of the median home value in your county.

    ...read more
  • Our Tax Expert

    Jennifer Mansfield, CPA Tax

    Jennifer Mansfield, CPA, JD/LLM-Tax, is a Certified Public Accountant with more than 30 years of experience providing tax advice. SmartAsset’s tax expert has a degree in Accounting and Business/Management from the University of Wyoming, as well as both a Masters in Tax Laws and a Juris Doctorate from Georgetown University Law Center. Jennifer has mostly worked in public accounting firms, including Ernst & Young and Deloitte. She is passionate about helping provide people and businesses with valuable accounting and tax advice to allow them to prosper financially. Jennifer lives in Arizona and was recently named to the Greater Tucson Leadership Program.

    ...read more
Mortgage Type Options
Based on a mortgage
Home Value Points Location Credit Score
Not what you're looking for? View personalized rates
No mortgages were found.
Searching for Mortgages...
Disclosure
View more mortgages
No mortgages were found.
Searching for Mortgages...
Disclosure
View more mortgages
No mortgages were found.
Searching for Mortgages...
Disclosure
View more mortgages
How helpful was this page in answering your question?
not helpful
very helpful
​If you could change one thing about ​this page what would it be?​
Thank you for your answer! Your feedback is very important to us.
We are working hard to improve our product and could use your help!
We pay $30 for 30 minutes on the phone to hear your thoughts on what we can do better.
Please enter your email if you'd like to be contacted to help.

Please enter your name

To calculate the exact amount of property tax you will owe requires your property's assessed value and the property tax rates based on your property's address. Please note that we can only estimate your property tax based on median property taxes in your area. There are typically multiple rates in a given area, because your state, county, local schools and emergency responders each receive funding partly through these taxes. In our calculator, we take your home value and multiply that by your county's effective property tax rate. This is equal to the median property tax paid as a percentage of the median home value in your county.

Ramsey County Property Tax Rates

Photo credit: ©iStock.com/PhilAugustavo

Ramsey County, whose county seat is also the state capital of St. Paul, levies property taxes twice per year. Homeowners there pay $2,598 in property taxes on average. Those taxes fund things like schools, roads and libraries.

CountyMedian Home ValueMedian Annual Property Tax PaymentAverage Effective Property Tax Rate
Arden Hills$264,400$3,4421.30%
Birchwood Village$310,800$2,9880.96%
Blaine$179,900$2,2291.24%
Falcon Heights$275,500$3,1351.14%
Gem Lake$285,500$4,1361.45%
Lauderdale$175,100$2,1591.23%
Little Canada$182,300$2,2701.25%
Maplewood$185,900$2,6101.40%
Mounds View$169,000$2,3801.41%
New Brighton$210,700$2,8821.37%
North Oaks$514,300$6,5041.26%
North St. Paul$178,000$2,2681.27%
Roseville$217,500$2,6611.22%
St. Anthony$224,100$3,6311.26%
Saint Paul$175,000$2,4751.41%
Shoreview$232,400$3,1071.34%
Spring Lake Park$158,700$2,2931.44%
Vadnais Heights$205,000$2,5761.26%
White Bear Lake $190,200$2,4151.27%

Several factors can affect your property taxes. Your property’s market value could increase or decrease. The city, county, school district or other taxing district under whose jurisdiction your property falls could decide to change the amount of money it wants to raise from property taxes (the tax levy). Legislative changes, approved by elected officials or through voter referendums, can also affect property taxes.

In general, people who live in the home they own (or who are relatives of the owner) and call the home their primary residence will pay lower property taxes than owners of, say, rental properties will pay. That’s because of Minnesota’s homestead program for Minnesotans who own and occupy their home. The homestead program reduces the taxable market value of the property (only for properties valued at less than $414,000). A lower taxable market value means a lower property tax bill, assuming rates stay the same. The homestead program also helps residents qualify for the State of Minnesota Property Tax Refund, which you can’t get for properties that aren’t classified as homesteads.

Ramsey County Property Tax Help

Photo credit: ©iStock.com/PhilAugustavo

Property taxes are a big expense for many home-owning households, and it’s not uncommon for people to struggle to keep up with their property tax bills. You may be eligible for a complete property tax exemption from Ramsey County if your property “creates energy, enables commerce, or conserves nature.”

If you don’t qualify for a property tax exemption but you think your property taxes are unfairly high (meaning that you think the assessed value of your property is inflated), you can appeal your property’s estimated market value with the county. To do so, contact the Assessor’s Office. You may be asked to leave a message outlining your case. If the county decides to proceed, you won’t get a value adjustment until an appraiser has come to your property to perform a review of your home (interior and exterior).

This only works for current and future tax bills. To appeal a prior year’s estimate value you will have to make an appeal through Minnesota Tax Court on or before April 30 of the year the taxes are payable. Even if you’re contesting your property taxes you must pay them in full and on time until your case is settled. Failure to do so will result in the dismissal of your property tax petition.

How Your Ramsey County Property Tax Bill Works

Photo credit: ©iStock.com/Lawrence Sawyer

You’ll get your first property tax communication from the County in March. It will include the value notice for your property (the assessed value that will be subject to taxes) and your tax statement. The tax statement tells you how much you’ll owe in property taxes for the first and second half of the year. It will also tell you how your taxes break down by tax authority, i.e. how much of your tax bill goes the school district, how much to the city government, etc.

The second property tax mailing goes out in November and includes the “proposed tax notice” for the following year. The tax notice tells you the proposed tax amounts for the following year and includes the dates for meetings where citizens can go to hear discussion on property taxes - or make their case for a rate change via public comment. Your property tax notice will also outline proposed levies and budget changes that could affect the property tax rates before they’re set and applied in the March tax statement of the following year.

In other words, the amount you see in your November tax estimate could differ from the amount you see on your tax statement the following March. New tax referendums, changes to homestead classifications, an increased or decreased tax levy or a special assessment on your property could all change your tax bill between November of one year and March of the following year.

If you’re paying by mail, it’s a good idea to include the original stub from your tax statement with your check or money order. Doing so will greatly reduce the processing time for your payment.

What if your property taxes are included in your payments to your mortgage company, or held in an escrow account and paid by the escrow company’s agent? In that case, the tax bill will be sent to your mortgage or escrow company and the tax statement you receive will include these words: “Our records show your taxes are paid by a mortgage company or escrow agent.”

If you see these words on your tax statement and you know that the mortgage company isn’t paying your property taxes anymore (because you paid off your mortgage, for example) or the escrow company no longer handles your property taxes, simply use the payment stub on your tax statement to make the payment yourself by check or money order.

Property Tax: Which Counties are Getting the Best Bang for Their Buck

SmartAsset’s interactive map highlights the places across the country where property tax dollars are being spent most effectively. Zoom between states and the national map to see the counties getting the biggest bang for their property tax buck.

Worse
Better
Rank County Property Tax Rate School Rating Crimes Per 100k People

Methodology

Our study aims to find the places in the United States where people are getting the most for their property tax dollars. To do this we looked at school rankings, crime rates and property taxes for every county.

As a way to measure the quality of schools, we calculated the average math and reading/language arts proficiencies for all the school districts in the country. Within each state, these schools were then ranked between 1 and 10 (with 10 being the best) based on those average scores.

For each county, we calculated the violent and property crimes per 100,000 residents.

Using the school and crime numbers, we calculated a community score. This is the ratio of the school rank to the combined crime rate per 100,000 residents.

We used the number of households, median home value and average property tax rate to calculate a per capita property tax collected for each county.

Finally, we calculated a tax value by creating a ratio of the community score to the per capita property tax paid. This shows us the counties in the country where people are getting the most bang for their buck, or where their property tax dollars are going the furthest.

Sources: US Census Bureau 2016 American Community Survey, Department of Education, Federal Bureau of Investigation, State Police or Justice Department websites