Loading
Tap on the profile icon to edit
your financial details.

King County, WA Property Tax Calculator

Your Details Done

Overview of King County, WA Taxes

King County, Washington’s average effective property tax rate is 1.02%. That’s right in line with the state of Washington’s average effective property tax rate of 1.08%.

Not in Washington?
Enter your financial details to calculate your taxes
Enter Your Location
Dismiss
Assessed Home Value
Dismiss
Average Tax Rate
0.0%
Property Taxes
$0
(Annual)
How Your Property Taxes Compare Based on an Assessed Home Value of
of Assessed Home Value
of Assessed Home Value
National
of Assessed Home Value
  • About This Answer

    To calculate the exact amount of property tax you will owe requires your property's assessed value and the property tax rates based on your property's address. Please note that we can only estimate your property tax based on median property taxes in your area. There are typically multiple rates in a given area, because your state, county, local schools and emergency responders each receive funding partly through these taxes. In our calculator, we take your home value and multiply that by your county's effective property tax rate. This is equal to the median property tax paid as a percentage of the median home value in your county.

    ...read more
  • Our Tax Expert

    Jennifer Mansfield Tax

    Jennifer Mansfield, CPA, JD/LLM-Tax, is a Certified Public Accountant with more than 30 years of experience providing tax advice. SmartAsset’s tax expert has a degree in Accounting and Business/Management from the University of Wyoming, as well as both a Masters in Tax Laws and a Juris Doctorate from Georgetown University Law Center. Jennifer has mostly worked in public accounting firms, including Ernst & Young and Deloitte. She is passionate about helping provide people and businesses with valuable accounting and tax advice to allow them to prosper financially. Jennifer lives in Arizona and was recently named to the Greater Tucson Leadership Program.

    ...read more
Mortgage Type Options
Based on a mortgage
Home Value Points Location Credit Score
Not what you're looking for? View personalized rates
No mortgages were found.
Searching for Mortgages...
Disclosure
View more mortgages
No mortgages were found.
Searching for Mortgages...
Disclosure
View more mortgages
No mortgages were found.
Searching for Mortgages...
Disclosure
View more mortgages
How helpful was this page in answering your question?
not helpful
very helpful
​If you could change one thing about ​this page what would it be?​
Thank you for your answer! Your feedback is very important to us.
We are working hard to improve our product and could use your help!
We pay $30 for 30 minutes on the phone to hear your thoughts on what we can do better.
Please enter your email if you'd like to be contacted to help.

Please enter your name

To calculate the exact amount of property tax you will owe requires your property's assessed value and the property tax rates based on your property's address. Please note that we can only estimate your property tax based on median property taxes in your area. There are typically multiple rates in a given area, because your state, county, local schools and emergency responders each receive funding partly through these taxes. In our calculator, we take your home value and multiply that by your county's effective property tax rate. This is equal to the median property tax paid as a percentage of the median home value in your county.

King County Property Tax Rates

Photo credit: ©iStock.com/tab1962

Over 60 cities, towns and census-designated places (CDPs) in the state of Washington are considered part of King County. Average effective property tax rates vary throughout the county. The lowest average effective property tax rate in the county is 0.59%. The highest is 1.36%. That means many residents in King County have a lower property tax burden than most people across the country.

Median home values in King County range from $185,500 in Algona to $1 million in places such as Yarrow Point, Medina and Clyde Hill. The median amount of property taxes paid by King County residents also varies, ranging from $1,488 in Skykomish to $10,000 in places like Hunts Point and Medina.

Overall, King County property owners paid a median of $3,855 in property taxes in 2014. In the state of Washington, the median amount of property taxes paid by residents was $2,785.

CountyMedian Home ValueMedian Annual Property Tax PaymentAverage Effective Property Tax Rate
Algona$185,500$2,5231.36%
Ames Lake$523,000$5,5791.07%
Auburn$231,200$3,0611.32%
Baring $276,300$2,9831.08%
Beaux Arts Village$957,400$7,5430.79%
Bellevue$538,300$4,1070.76%
Black Diamond$295,100$3,3191.12%
Bothell$344,600$3,3540.97%
Boulevard Park$231,100$2,7391.19%
Bryn Mawr-Skyway$276,300$3,2611.18%
Burien$273,800$3,2931.20%
Carnation$292,900$3,4491.18%
Clyde Hill$1,000,000$8,6510.87%
Cottage Lake$559,200$6,4351.15%
Covington$261,200$3,4381.32%
Des Moines$247,000$3,1011.26%
Duvall$361,400$4,1031.14%
East Renton Highlands$337,000$3,8341.14%
Enumclaw$233,500$2,4651.06%
Fairwood$324,000$4,3161.33%
Fall City$354,500$4,1561.17%
Federal Way$242,800$3,0381.25%
Hobart$411,000$5,3881.31%
Hunts Point$1,000,000$10,0001.00%
Issaquah$449,800$4,0340.90%
Kenmore$392,900$4,6091.17%
Kent$251,000$3,2411.29%
Klahanie $454,200$5,4891.21%
Kirkland$424,700$3,9470.93%
Lake Forest Park$426,700$4,9301.16%
Lake Holm$372,000$4,0041.08%
Lakeland North$251,100$3,3861.35%
Lakeland South$257,400$3,3231.29%
Lake Marcel-Stillwater$387,800$4,4221.14%
Lake Morton-Berrydale $328,500$4,4511.35%
Maple Heights-Lake Desire$393,600$5,1471.31%
Maple Valley$288,900$3,5721.24%
Medina$1,000,000$10,0001.00%
Mercer Island$871,600$6,4500.74%
Milton$224,700$2,4131.07%
Mirrormont$493,000$5,7501.17%
Newcastle$509,300$5,4951.08%
Normandy Park$462,700$5,9931.30%
North Bend$390,500$3,9901.02%
Pacific$211,800$2,7471.30%
Ravensdale$373,800$3,4770.93%
Redmond$462,200$4,0130.87%
Renton$282,400$3,1971.13%
Riverbend$284,200$3,4881.23%
Sammamish$586,400$5,9021.01%
SeaTac$224,600$2,6381.17%
Seattle$437,400$3,8600.88%
Shadow Lake$350,000$4,5321.29%
Shoreline$330,200$3,9791.21%
Skykomish$253,600$1,4880.59%
Snoqualmie$435,800$4,6341.06%
Snoqualmie Pass$344,700$2,4040.70%
Tanner $457,300$6,0931.33%
Tukwila$246,600$2,9851.21%
Union Hill-Novelty Hill$565,100$6,2041.10%
Vashon$395,500$4,4761.13%
White Center$235,200$2,8041.19%
Wilderness Rim$274,200$3,4291.25%
Woodinville$437,500$5,1171.17%
Yarrow Point$1,000,000$10,0001.00%

King County residents pay two different types of property taxes: real property taxes (for homes, buildings and land) and personal property taxes (for equipment, machinery and mobile homes located in mobile home parks). If you live in the area, your property tax bill is calculated by multiplying the effective property tax rate by the estimated value of your property.

Property tax bills are also based on the cost of running the local and state governments. Property taxes are used to provide funding for hospitals, schools, libraries and local projects and services.

King County Property Tax Breaks

Photo credit: ©iStock.com/Art Wager

Even a small property tax bill can be burdensome for certain King County residents. If you struggle to pay your property taxes every year, you may want to consider finding out if you’re eligible for a tax break. Exemptions are available for different groups of people, including farmers with certain machinery or equipment and homeowners who’ve renovated their single-family homes or historic properties.

Disabled taxpayers and seniors who are at least 61 years old may be able to lower their property tax bills if their annual income is under $40,000. To qualify for an exemption, these individuals also need to own and occupy a home in King County. If you’re not eligible for that tax break, you may qualify for a property tax deferral if your disposable income doesn’t exceed $45,000.

Some low-income homeowners may be able to defer the payment of their property taxes, too. If you earn less than $58,000 annually and you’ve owned property in King County for at least five years, you may be able to defer 25% of your property taxes. To request a deferral, residents will need to complete an application and submit it to the County Assessor by September 1.

Another exemption offers tax relief to property owners with damaged property. In addition to filing a form with the County Assessor, King County residents may be required to submit additional documentation, such as a report from the fire department following a fire or paperwork provided by an insurance company following a natural disaster.

Paying Your King County Property Taxes

Photo credit: ©iStock.com/4nadia

Wondering how much you owe in property taxes? You (or your mortgage lender) should receive a bill in the mail in February. In the meantime, you can view your property tax bill online by visiting kingcounty.gov and entering your tax account number for your real or personal property (you can find this number on your Assessor's Valuation Change Notice or an older property tax statement). If you haven’t received a bill by March 1 (and your mortgage lender hasn’t gotten anything either), you may need to request a statement online or by calling the Treasury Operations Property Tax Office.

If you have questions about your property tax bill and the way the county assessed the value of your property, you can email or call the County Assessor. To appeal your property appraisal, you can file a petition with the local Board of Equalization.

In King County, property taxes are usually paid in two installments. First-half taxes must be postmarked by April 30. Second-half taxes must be paid or postmarked by October 31. If you miss these deadlines, your property taxes become delinquent the following day. For every month that your payment is late, you’ll be charged interest (equal to 1% of the amount that’s due). You could also get hit with a 3% penalty if you don’t pay the full amount of your first installment by June 1 and an 8% penalty if you don’t pay all of your second-half property taxes by December 1.

When you’re ready to pay your property tax bill, you can do so online with a check or credit card. You can also either mail in your payment or pay it in person at the King County Treasury Operations Office.

Property Tax: Which Counties are Getting the Best Bang for Their Buck

SmartAsset’s interactive map highlights the places across the country where property tax dollars are being spent most effectively. Zoom between states and the national map to see the counties getting the biggest bang for their property tax buck.

Worse
Better
Rank County Property Tax Rate School Rating Crimes Per 100k People

Methodology

Our study aims to find the places in the United States where people are getting the most for their property tax dollars. To do this we looked at school rankings, crime rates and property taxes for every county.

As a way to measure the quality of schools, we calculated the average math and reading/language arts proficiencies for all the school districts in the country. Within each state, these schools were then ranked between 1 and 10 (with 10 being the best) based on those average scores.

For each county, we calculated the violent and property crimes per 100,000 residents.

Using the school and crime numbers, we calculated a community score. This is the ratio of the school rank to the combined crime rate per 100,000 residents.

We used the number of households, median home value and average property tax rate to calculate a per capita property tax collected for each county.

Finally, we calculated a tax value by creating a ratio of the community score to the per capita property tax paid. This shows us the counties in the country where people are getting the most bang for their buck, or where their property tax dollars are going the furthest.

Sources: US Census Bureau 2016 American Community Survey, Department of Education, Federal Bureau of Investigation, State Police or Justice Department websites