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Washington County, OR Property Tax Calculator

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Overview of Washington County, OR Taxes

The more than 500,000 residents of Washington County, Oregon face an average effective property tax rate of 1.17%. That’s higher than Oregon state’s 1.08% average effective property tax rate.

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  • About This Answer

    To calculate the exact amount of property tax you will owe requires your property's assessed value and the property tax rates based on your property's address. Please note that we can only estimate your property tax based on median property taxes in your area. There are typically multiple rates in a given area, because your state, county, local schools and emergency responders each receive funding partly through these taxes. In our calculator, we take your home value and multiply that by your county's effective property tax rate. This is equal to the median property tax paid as a percentage of the median home value in your county.

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  • Our Tax Expert

    Jennifer Mansfield, CPA Tax

    Jennifer Mansfield, CPA, JD/LLM-Tax, is a Certified Public Accountant with more than 30 years of experience providing tax advice. SmartAsset’s tax expert has a degree in Accounting and Business/Management from the University of Wyoming, as well as both a Masters in Tax Laws and a Juris Doctorate from Georgetown University Law Center. Jennifer has mostly worked in public accounting firms, including Ernst & Young and Deloitte. She is passionate about helping provide people and businesses with valuable accounting and tax advice to allow them to prosper financially. Jennifer lives in Arizona and was recently named to the Greater Tucson Leadership Program.

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To calculate the exact amount of property tax you will owe requires your property's assessed value and the property tax rates based on your property's address. Please note that we can only estimate your property tax based on median property taxes in your area. There are typically multiple rates in a given area, because your state, county, local schools and emergency responders each receive funding partly through these taxes. In our calculator, we take your home value and multiply that by your county's effective property tax rate. This is equal to the median property tax paid as a percentage of the median home value in your county.

Washington County Property Tax Rates

Photo credit: ©iStock.com/Jeremiah Thompson

Taxpayers in Washington County, Oregon’s third-most populous county, pay some of the highest property taxes in the state. County residents paid a median of $3,278 in property taxes in 2014. Compare that to Oregon’s overall median property tax payment of $2,518 for the year.

But the amount you’ll pay in property taxes will likely vary depending on where you live within Washington County. While Rivergrove residents pay an average effective property tax rate of just 0.78%, taxpayers living in Beaverton, Forest Grove or Sherwood can expect to pay rates of 1.34%, 1.33% and 1.32%, respectively, per year.

CountyMedian Home ValueMedian Annual Property Tax PaymentAverage Effective Property Tax Rate
Aloha$222,000$2,5271.14%
Banks$227,200$2,6991.19%
Beaverton$277,500$3,7251.34%
Bethany$394,800$4,2341.07%
Bull Mountain$365,900$4,1021.12%
Cedar Hills$290,300$2,8090.97%
Cedar Mill$453,300$4,8081.06%
Cornelius$179,500$2,3591.31%
Durham$384,700$4,3641.13%
Forest Grove$223,500$2,9741.33%
Garden Home-Whitford$314,200$3,3131.05%
Gaston$178,700$1,8361.03%
Hillsboro$238,300$2,9041.22%
King City$180,900$2,1731.20%
Lake Oswego$478,400$5,1891.08%
Metzger$270,300$2,8021.04%
North Plains$225,900$2,4651.09%
Oak Hills$325,000$3,5001.08%
Portland$285,300$3,2691.15%
Raleigh Hills$493,000$4,9711.01%
Rivergrove$536,200$4,2060.78%
Rockcreek$305,000$3,5171.15%
Sherwood$295,300$3,8921.32%
Tigard$294,000$3,3501.14%
Tualatin$310,400$3,6661.18%
West Haven-Sylvan$380,300$3,8961.02%
West Slope$395,900$4,2191.07%
Wilsonville$336,300$4,3071.28%

Median home values in Washington County also vary widely depending where you live. While Gaston’s median home values are in the neighborhood of $178,700, median home values in Rivergrove top out at $536,200. Overall, the county’s median home value is $279,100.

Paying Your Washington County Property Taxes

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Each year, you’ll receive your annual property tax bill in late October with a due date in mid November. Washington County Property Tax payments are due on November 15. In cases where the 15 th falls on a weekend, the date will shift to the next business day.

Washington County residents might notice that their property tax statements are color-coded either yellow or green. Receiving a yellow statement means that either the Oregon Department of Revenue or the Senior Disabled Citizen Deferral Program may have been sent a copy of your property tax bill. Green statements are meant to show that the property owner is responsible for paying all property taxes due. It’s a good idea to check with your lender if you feel unsure of whether or not you’ll be responsible for the home’s property taxes.

In situations where you’ll need to pay the property’s tax bill yourself, you have several different payment method choices. Washington County accepts online payments by credit card, debit card and e-check. You’ll be subject to a 2.49% convenience fee if you plan to pay by credit or debit card. It’s important to consider that a fee of $24.90 for every $1,000 of property taxes owed can add up quickly.

If you’d rather avoid paying online, Washington County offers the option to pay in person at the county tax office in Hillsboro, over the phone or by mail. Those paying in person can choose to pay by debit or credit card (with the same 2.49% convenience fee), cash, check or money order. Payments by mail need to be in the form of either check or money order to be accepted. Whether you choose to pay in person or by mail, it’s best to include the account number on your tax bill on all money orders or checks you use to pay your taxes.

Washington County taxpayers have a few options for paying their tax bill. Residents who pay their property tax bill in full by November 15 get a 3% discount. For those who opt not to pay the full payment by the 15, paying two-thirds of the payment will result in a 2% discount with the rest of the payment due by May 15. Finally, paying just one-third by the November due date will mean foregoing any discounts but allows due dates of February 15 and May 15 for the final two payments.

If you’re late paying your property tax payments, interest will begin adding up at a rate of 1.33% per month. Washington County taxpayers have a window of three years after their property tax due date before the foreclosure process will begin.

How Your Washington County Property Tax Works

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Oregon passed laws in the 1990s that still affect the state’s property taxes today. These laws place limits on total effective property tax rates and the growth in home values that determines these rates. Residents also enjoy the laws’ added benefit that property tax rates stay fairly stable from year to year.

Oregon differs from other states with the way it handles property taxes in that a home’s market value does not always decide its property tax rate. Taxes can instead apply to its maximum assessed value in the event that this number is lower than market value.

According to the Oregon Department of Revenue, a home’s maximum assessed value, or MAV, is its taxable value limit. This value is based on percentage increases in previous years’ values dating back to 1997 when MAV was first used.

The first maximum assessed value for each property was calculated using the 1995-96 tax year’s market value minus 10%. Since then, MAV is based a 3% increase of last year’s MAV except in cases when the property’s market value is lower than its maximum assessed value. A property’s MAV can increase by more than 3% in cases where additions to a property are constructed, the property is rezoned or the property no longer qualifies for an exemption.

Property Tax: Which Counties are Getting the Best Bang for Their Buck

SmartAsset’s interactive map highlights the places across the country where property tax dollars are being spent most effectively. Zoom between states and the national map to see the counties getting the biggest bang for their property tax buck.

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Rank County Property Tax Rate School Rating Crimes Per 100k People

Methodology

Our study aims to find the places in the United States where people are getting the most for their property tax dollars. To do this we looked at school rankings, crime rates and property taxes for every county.

As a way to measure the quality of schools, we calculated the average math and reading/language arts proficiencies for all the school districts in the country. Within each state, these schools were then ranked between 1 and 10 (with 10 being the best) based on those average scores.

For each county, we calculated the violent and property crimes per 100,000 residents.

Using the school and crime numbers, we calculated a community score. This is the ratio of the school rank to the combined crime rate per 100,000 residents.

We used the number of households, median home value and average property tax rate to calculate a per capita property tax collected for each county.

Finally, we calculated a tax value by creating a ratio of the community score to the per capita property tax paid. This shows us the counties in the country where people are getting the most bang for their buck, or where their property tax dollars are going the furthest.

Sources: US Census Bureau 2016 American Community Survey, Department of Education, Federal Bureau of Investigation, State Police or Justice Department websites